What’s Rights Got to Do With It? Your Reflections

Teaching
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Thank you Adam, Alexander, Alexandra, Anton, Elmeri, Ester, Evelina, Katja, Laura, Milena, Ulrika, Vera and Vivi. Please find below some thoughts that your responses to the lecture elicited:

PS: Screening the video I realized I made a snafu. I mentioned the Finnish constitution as recognizing diverse media. While the Finnish constitution recognizes diverse forms of communication rights beyond the freedom of speech it is the EU Charter of fundamental rights that is more explicit about the media. Sorry about that. I had just been writing a related commentary on that and “wires got crossed” in my informal response to you.

What’s Right’s Got to Do With It? Gender, Feminisms, and the Media

Teaching
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Welcome to the 3-part video lecture on Gender, feminisms, the media and policies! (Pro tip: I speak quite slowly. Try 1.5 x speed if you want a more speedy lecture!)

Part O, the Introduction, is here:

The below video, Part 1, is intended to create a context for gender and the media today:

Part 2 of the video lecture is focused on the role of policy in supporting fairer gender portrayal – mission (im)possible?

A couple of extra resources that might interest you:

The above mentioned study on women journalists and harassment in the US and Canada. A similar study in the Global South. Two videos on gender and communication rights, with a global framework.

Questions for you (answer one or all):

  1. Do you think a rights-based approach could be a policy solution to gender injustices regarding the media? If so, why; if not, why not?
  2. What issues would you prioritize?
  3. Who could or should monitor gender-based inequalities in participation and portrayal? Nationally/internationally?

To ensure your privacy, please email your answers to Dr. Siivonen who will then email them to me – and I will send you a synthesis response.

Communication Rights: Elusive but Essential

Teaching
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Welcome to the lecture

Here are your additional materials

  1. McIver, William J., Birdsall, William F., & Rasmussen, Merrilee (2003). “The internet and right to communicate”. First Monday, 8(12). (open access).
  2. Chapter 1 by Shoshana Zuboff from Jørgensen, Rikke Frank (2019, ed.). Human Rights in the Age of Platforms. Visual Communication. Understanding Images in Media Culture. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 342 s. (open access).
  3. Podcast: “Rights in Differing Contexts”.
  4. Extra material, if interested: RightsCon2020 conference “the world’s leading summit on human rights in the digital age”, a selection of panel discussions and talks can be viewed on YouTube.  

Assignment: Mission Impossible?

Please respond to these questions with the comment function below.

1.Is the concept of communication rights feasible at all? Why or why not?

Let’s, for a moment, assume that it is. 

2.What should be included as comm rights?

3.Would these rights be universal or relative?

4.Who should monitor and implement them?

Noteworthy

Note that you can remain anonymous. Use any screen name. You will be asked to sign in with an email. Please use the email Prof. Parthasarathi has for you so I can communicate to him about your participation. However, only I, as the admin, will see your email that will identify you. No one else.

Please also note that I need to moderate your comment. I may not be online when you are. Please allow 24 hours for your comment to appear. If you have not seen it by then, please contact Prof. Parthasarathi.

Old is New Again: Public Service Media Rebuilding Trust

Good News, Research

Public service media, in its different reiterations, is needed more than ever to support and defend democracy.

While political and cultural contexts, organisational configurations, funding models and resources, even programmatic priorities and technological capacities may differ, the unifying characteristics remain: the basic, traditional mission and remit of quality services to all kinds of audiences. And while pressures on public service media mount all around the world, there are many strategies that exemplify and support that mission. This was the powerful message of  the PMA Conference Speak Out! Rebuilding Trust in Media and Democracy, in Kingston, Jamaica, 13 August 2018.

See my report on the conference, here.

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Public Service Media and Information Disorder

Research

Screen Shot 2018-05-26 at 8.07.47 AMPublic service media (PSM) institutions around the world exist in challenging conditions: not only do the commercial counterparts claim that PSM is distorting the market, governments are increasingly meddling with content and tightening financing for these institutions. This is an alarming trend in times of viral misinformation, filter bubbles, distrust of media, and global political and economic turbulence.

This White Paper for the Center for Media, Data and Society, Central European University, paper builds on the Center’s public media speakers series, focusing on a specific challenge for public service media: “#fakenews” and #disinformation, or more broadly, the current “information disorder”. The paper draws from the outlined problems and threats, as well as opportunities, strategies, and tactics of public service media institutions around Europe with regard to tackling this challenge.

Download the White Paper here: publicservicemediaandinformationdisorder