What’s Right’s Got to Do With It? Gender, Feminisms, and the Media

Teaching
Photo by JESHOOTS.com on Pexels.com

Welcome to the 3-part video lecture on Gender, feminisms, the media and policies! (Pro tip: I speak quite slowly. Try 1.5 x speed if you want a more speedy lecture!)

Part O, the Introduction, is here:

The below video, Part 1, is intended to create a context for gender and the media today:

Part 2 of the video lecture is focused on the role of policy in supporting fairer gender portrayal – mission (im)possible?

A couple of extra resources that might interest you:

The above mentioned study on women journalists and harassment in the US and Canada. A similar study in the Global South. Two videos on gender and communication rights, with a global framework.

Questions for you (answer one or all):

  1. Do you think a rights-based approach could be a policy solution to gender injustices regarding the media? If so, why; if not, why not?
  2. What issues would you prioritize?
  3. Who could or should monitor gender-based inequalities in participation and portrayal? Nationally/internationally?

To ensure your privacy, please email your answers to Dr. Siivonen who will then email them to me – and I will send you a synthesis response.

Communication Rights: Elusive but Essential

Teaching
Photo by Markus Spiske on Pexels.com

Welcome to the lecture

Here are your additional materials

  1. McIver, William J., Birdsall, William F., & Rasmussen, Merrilee (2003). “The internet and right to communicate”. First Monday, 8(12). (open access).
  2. Chapter 1 by Shoshana Zuboff from Jørgensen, Rikke Frank (2019, ed.). Human Rights in the Age of Platforms. Visual Communication. Understanding Images in Media Culture. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 342 s. (open access).
  3. Podcast: “Rights in Differing Contexts”.
  4. Extra material, if interested: RightsCon2020 conference “the world’s leading summit on human rights in the digital age”, a selection of panel discussions and talks can be viewed on YouTube.  

Assignment: Mission Impossible?

Please respond to these questions with the comment function below.

1.Is the concept of communication rights feasible at all? Why or why not?

Let’s, for a moment, assume that it is. 

2.What should be included as comm rights?

3.Would these rights be universal or relative?

4.Who should monitor and implement them?

Noteworthy

Note that you can remain anonymous. Use any screen name. You will be asked to sign in with an email. Please use the email Prof. Parthasarathi has for you so I can communicate to him about your participation. However, only I, as the admin, will see your email that will identify you. No one else.

Please also note that I need to moderate your comment. I may not be online when you are. Please allow 24 hours for your comment to appear. If you have not seen it by then, please contact Prof. Parthasarathi.

IGF 2019

Uncategorized

IGF2019

COMMUNICATION RIGHTS IN THE AGE OF DIGITAL DISRUPTION

Two CORDI researchers, Outi Puukko and Minna Horowitz, attended the Internet Governace Forum 2019 in Berlin, 25-29. November 2019. The theme of this year’s IGF was “One world. One Net. One Vision”.

Puukko conducted research interviews for her doctoral dissertation project “Civil society actors and the digital human rights discourse”. The project focuses on civil society actors role in the digital rights discourse, in particular, how civil society actors understand and define digital rights in their advocacy work on international arenas. The research data consists of thematic interviews with civil society representatives, participatory observation and document analysis.

Horowitz participated in in the panel Misinformation, Responsibilities & Trust. A short report of the panel can be found here.

View original post

Communication Rights in the Digital Age 24-25 October 2019

Uncategorized

Defining a field… Our #CommRightsHelsinki conference!

COMMUNICATION RIGHTS IN THE AGE OF DIGITAL DISRUPTION

The rights-based perspective on ethical and political questions presented by the new digital media has recently regained attention in academic and political debates. This conference will address the interplay of national and global (universal and specific) characteristics of communication rights: What are some definitions of communication rights? Who are the policy and other actors defining these rights? What are current core issues or cases that pertain to communication rights?

The international conference, Communication Rights in the Digital Age, 24-25 October 2019 in Helsinki, was organized by the Helsinki Media Policy Research Group, the University of Helsinki, the ECREA Communication Law and Policy Section and the Euromedia Research Group, and supported by the IAMCR Communication Policy & Technology Section. It was also supported by CORDI, and five of the project’s researchers presented their work in the conference.

The opening panel asked: What rights, whose rights, and who cares?

Communication rights…

View original post 263 more words